Wednesday, July 25, 2018

Minnie Holsinger, The Farmer's Wife 56, Manor Bakers, Henry Hintermeister

This is blog #56 of my on-going series sharing pages from the scrap book of Minnie Holsinger, which she compiled in the 30s and 40s while she and Grandpa Charlie were saving to buy a farm.

This illustration is from a series of images I assume that were culled by Grandma Minnie from a calendar produced by Manor Bakers in the late 30’s or early 40’s. The work is credited to Henry Hintermeister, who’s work has been featured in the Farmers Wife blog series posts 2, 5, 31, 32, 33, 53, 54 & 55.


God, how embarrassing. Did we, as Americans, used to be proud of this shit? Some Americans still are, apparently. It’s what they mean by “Make America Great Again!”, as in “Find some suckers you can rip off and exploit”, not realizing it’s themselves who are being ripped off and exploited.
Here's a sketch of Grandpa Charlie I drew in the late 70's or early 80's.

Tuesday, July 24, 2018

Minnie Holsinger, The Farmer's Wife 55, Manor Bakers, Henry Hintermeister, Manifest Destiny

This is blog #55 of my on-going series sharing pages from the scrap book of Minnie Holsinger, which she compiled in the 30s and 40s while she and Grandpa Charlie were saving to buy a farm.

This illustration is from a series of images I assume that were culled by Grandma Minnie from a calendar produced by Manor Bakers in the late 30’s or early 40’s. The work is credited to Henry Hintermeister, who’s work has been featured in the Farmers Wife blog series posts 2, 5, 31, 32, 33, 53 & 54.

Manifest Destiny.


 I’m curious and to the symbolic significance of the building shapes in the right background, behind the preacher dude. Is this suppose to represent the old world order, mandating the peg-legger (Peter Stuyvesant, I presume) to head out to the new world and remake it for caucasian protestants? This is odd because they’re on the right, facing left and usually that sort of thing (traveling towards a goal) is left facing right. On the other hand, on maps, Europe is to the right of the Americas, the East Coast is to the right of the West (Left) coast, etc, so it makes sense. Never mind. 

Monday, July 23, 2018

Minnie Holsinger, The Farmer's Wife 54, Manor Bakers, Henry Hintermeister

This is blog #54 of my on-going series sharing pages from the scrap book of Minnie Holsinger, which she compiled in the 30s and 40s while she and Grandpa Charlie were saving to buy a farm.

This illustration is from a series of images I assume that were culled by Grandma Minnie from a calendar produced by Manor Bakers in the late 30’s or early 40’s. The work is credited to Henry Hintermeister, who’s work has been featured in the Farmers Wife blog series posts 2, 5, 31, 32, 33 & 53. Mr. H was a popular and prolific illustrator back in the day, but is now all but unknown; at least, I’d never heard or seen of him until I started working on this series.

To recap from previous post-bios: Henry Hintermeister (b. 1897 / d. 1970)  His father John Henry Hintermeister was an illustrator as well.  Father and son often worked as a duo, from the 1890's to the 1940's, under the pseudonym Hy Hintermeister.  They became well known producing over 1,000 of illustrations; John Henry and Henry were often compared to Norman Rockwell with their illustration storytelling.  The duo produced a series of calendars depicting American history from 1775-1787.  They used identical signatures making their illustrations nearly impossible to distinguish.


So is this illustration by Hy Hintermeister Sr. or Jr
? Does it matter?

Sunday, July 22, 2018

Minnie Holsinger, The Farmer's Wife 53, Manor Bakers, Henry Hintermeister

This is blog #53 of my on-going series sharing pages from the scrap book of Minnie Holsinger, which she compiled in the 30s and 40s while she and Grandpa Charlie were saving to buy a farm.
This illustration is from a series of images I assume that were culled by Grandma Minnie from a calendar produced by Manor Bakers in the late 30’s or early 40’s. The work is credited to Henry Hintermeister, who’s work has been featured in the Farmers Wife blog series posts 2, 5, 31, 32, & 33. Mr. H was a popular and prolific illustrator back in the day, but is now all but unknown; at least, I’d never heard or seen of him until I started working on this series.

Tuesday, July 17, 2018

Minnie Holsinger, The Farmer's Wife 52, Manor Bakers, William Steeple Davis

This is blog #52 of my on-going series sharing pages from the scrap book of Minnie Holsinger, which she compiled in the 30s and 40s while she and Grandpa Charlie were saving to buy a farm.

Above is a link to a biography of William Steeple Davis. (1884-1961) painter of the image reproduced here. He was a self-taught painter, etcher, print maker and photographer. he was a homebody rarely leaving the village of Orient, on the northern shore of Long Island.
This seems to be clipped from the Manor Bakers calendar (?) from which Grandma Minnie culled yesterday's blog entry. This is the second in a series of 9 paintings depicting, in a highly idealized way, the discovery and settling of America by Europeans. This painting is titled "Columbus Approaching the Shores of America". 

Monday, July 16, 2018

Minnie Holsinger, The Farmer's Wife 51, Manor Bakers, Edward Moran

This is blog #51 of my on-going series sharing pages from the scrap book of Minnie Holsinger, which she compiled in the 30s and 40s while she and Grandpa Charlie were saving to buy a farm.
For the next several blogs I will be posting images from what I assume to be a Manor Bakers’ Complimentary Wall Calendar. I could easily be wrong; after this “title” image there are only 9 others; the paper is too thing to withstand a year’s worth of hanging display and there’s nothing printed on the reverse side. Yet I can’t imagine what else it could be. The subject of this series of paintings seems to be the “discovery” and settlement of America by the British, told in highly Christian-mythologized terms. Most of them are by Henry (HY) Hintermeister, who we’ve encounter many times before in this blog series.


This lead image is by Edward Moran (1829-1901), once-famed-but-now-forgotten maritime painter. Here’s a link to his wikipedia page https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Moran

Moran died in 1901, so the painting shown here couldn't have been commissioned by Manor Bakers or whoever packaged whatever sort of cultural artifact this series of paintings spring from. Perhaps the ensuing works were cobbled together from other sources as well.

Saturday, July 14, 2018

Minnie Holsinger, The Farmer's Wife 50, Marguerite de Angeli

This is blog #50 of my on-going series sharing pages from the scrap book of Minnie Holsinger, which she compiled in the 30s and 40s while she and Grandpa Charlie were saving to buy a farm.
Here’s a link to Marguerite de Angeli’s Wikipedia page:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marguerite_de_Angeli

Here are some highlights: “Her 1946 story “Bright April” was the first children’s book to address the divisive issue of racial prejudice. She was twice named a Caldecott Honor Book illustator, first in 1945 for “Yonie Wondernose” and 1955 for “Book of Nursery and Mother Goose Rhymes”. She received a 1950 Newberry Medal for “Door in the Wall” (evocative title, I’m looking forward to reading that one).” 
From my perspective, researching and blogging about Grandma Minnie’s scrap file has been revelatory. Each day, I learn about illustrators who previously were completely unknown to me. Marguerite de Angeli is an prime example of this. She was exemplary of the secular humanist values of compassion and tolerance that I aspire to. Quoting the Wikipedia article further: “Her work explored and depicted the traditions and rich cultural diversity of common people more frequently overlooked- a semi-autobiographical Great Depression family, African American children experiencing the sting of racial prejudice, Polish mine workers aspiring to life beyond the Pennsylvania coal mines, the physically handicapped, colonial Mennonites, the Amish, nineteenth-century Quakers supporting the underground railroad, immigrants, and other traditional or ethic peoples. De Angeli’s books carry an underlying message that we are really all the same, and that all of us deserve tolerance, care consideration and respect”

I’ve fallen in love with this woman who I’ve only just met!

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