Tuesday, June 19, 2018

Minnie Holsinger, The Farmer's Wife 29, Pauline Krueztfeldt

This is image #29 of my on-going series sharing the pages of the scrap book of Minnie Holsinger, which she collected in the 30s and 40s while she and my Grandfather Charlie Holsinger were saving to buy a farm.
https://picclick.co.uk sez:
“Pauline Kruetzfeldt -Artist
Birth place: Holstein, Germany Date unknown. 
Died Oct 29, 1960 Saratoga Springs NY
Lived in Fort Plain, NY and New York City, and Near Saratoga Springs NY
Profession: Painter, designer, illustrator
Studied: at New York City Art Students League with George Bridgman, Ben Foster.
Exhibited: Horticultural Soc. NY, 1930 (prize); S. Indp. A., 1931-32; Salons of Am., 1934; NGA; Carnegie Inst., 
1943; Albany Inst. Hist. & A., 1946; Munson-Williams-Proctor Inst.,Utica NY 1946; Nicola Squillaci Art Galleries , Schenectady Ny 1962.
 Illustrator, American Home, Better Homes & Gardens, Woman's Home Companion, 1936, Country Gentleman, 1937, other magazines.”


Today’s post is quite different than yesterdays floral arrangement by Nelson Grofe. 

Grofe’s painting, to my unsubtle eyes, could have been painted in the 17th or 18th century. I’m thinking Zubaran, or (new find while image hunting for this blog) Adriaen Coorte, a Danish 17th/18th still-life artist .


Ms. Kruetzfeldt is on a completely different trip, at least as far as this painting is concerned. The artist is going for a poster-like effect, almost as if designing for a quilt (made especially overt by placing a subtle grid over the red/orange background. One commonality with the earlier artists: the butterfly. Insects were a common symbol in old European still-lifes, referring to decay and the impermanence of all this in this profane world.

Just for laughs, here’s the only other work by Kruetzfeld that I was able to find on the web. 

Minnie Holsinger, The Farmer's Wife 28, Nelson Grofe

This is image #28 of my on-going series sharing the pages of the scrap book of Minnie Holsinger, which she collected in the 30s and 40s while she and my Grandfather Charlie Holsinger were saving to buy a farm.
This illustration is by Lloyd Nelson Grofe, listed on Ebay as a “Pennsylvania Impressionist”. That’s the same group or classification that Walter Emerson Baum (The Farmer’s Wife 20/21) was lumped into/ classified as. I could find no biography in my superficial internet search, except that examples of his illustration for “Country Gentleman Magazine” and “Country Life” are currently available on Ebay (Act Now!)

My late Grandmother Minnie was super-into paintings of floral arrangements, and you’ll be seeing many of them in the weeks to come.

Monday, June 18, 2018

Minnie Holsinger, The Farmer's Wife #27, Edmund Franklin Ward

This is image #27 of my on-going series sharing the pages of the scrap book of Minnie Holsinger, which she collected in the 30s and 40s while she and my Grandfather Charlie Holsinger were saving to buy a farm.
Wikipedia sez:
“Edmund F. Ward (January 3, 1892 – December 14, 1990)[1] illustrated for the Saturday Evening Post and did his first illustrations for the magazine before turning age 20. He had a successful career as an illustrator of works that ranged in style and subject matter from dark tonalist in oils to humorous in wash and watercolor. For many years he illustrated the Alexander Botts and Assistant District Attorney Doowinkle stories for the Saturday Evening Post.[2]

Ward studied at the Art Students League in the same class with Norman Rockwell. The two students became friends, and shared a studio in the attic of a Manhattan brownstone. [3] Among his teachers were Edward Dufner, George Bridgman and Thomas Fogarty. He later moved to the Manhattan suburb of New Rochelle, a well known artist colony and home to many of the top commercial illustrators of the day including friend Norman Rockwell.[4][5] At the time more than fifty percent of the illustrations in the country’s leading publications were done by artists from New Rochelle.[6] He spent his professional career in White Plains, where he painted a mural for the Federal Building. He was a longtime member of the Salmagundi Club, the Guild of Free Lance Artists, and was a member of the Society of Illustrators.[7]”
I LOVE the color use (especially on the boy's face; the way it places pink against blue. In fact, most of the painting seems to be playing off pink against blue. Except for the ground at the boy's feet. On a side note, it fascinates me that E.F. Ward was completely unknown to me before researching this blog post, but Norman Rockwell is a major cultural icon. T'would be interesting to compare/ contrast the two for insights as to "how come"?

Sunday, June 17, 2018

Minnie Holsinger, The Farmer's Wife #26

This is image #26 of my on-going series sharing the pages of the scrap book of Minnie Holsinger, which she collected in the 30s and 40s while she and my Grandfather Charlie Holsinger were saving to buy a farm.
I assume this is the cover to an issue of Country Gentleman Magazine from the late 30’s or early 40’s. I can’t identify the artist. The signature in the lower right corner is unreadable. Any thoughts?

Saturday, June 16, 2018

Spacenstein, Frankenstein, San Diego Comic Fest, C.A.P.S

This drawing was done Thursday, June 14, 2018 at the monthly meeting of C.A.P.S. (Comic Artist Professional Society) in Burbank, California. I call this character "Spacenstein". 


He was inspired by the meeting's topic of discussion, i.e., how CAPS could take better advantage of Conventions and a how Comic Book Convention organizers could make good use of CAPS. The evening's featured guest. Matt Dunford, organizer of the San Diego Comic Fest, an alternative to Comic Con International, which, in recent years, has come to treat Comic Books and their creators like poor cousins. Matt, when discussing how artists should bring ideas for interesting Panel to conventions, bragged about how the most recent SDCF was practically alone in the field for featuring celebrations attendant to the 200th Anniversary of Frankenstein.

Minnie Holsinger, The Farmer's Wife #25

This is image #25 of my on-going series sharing the pages of the scrap book of Minnie Holsinger, which she collected in the 30s and 40s while she and my Grandfather Charlie Holsinger were saving to buy a farm.
I assume this is the cover to an issue of Country Gentleman Magazine from the late 30’s or early 40’s. I can’t identify the artist. This is a very striking image, and I’d love to know the name of the artist.

Friday, June 15, 2018

Minnie Holsinger, The Farmer's Wife #24

This is image #24 of my on-going series sharing the pages of the scrap book of Minnie Holsinger, which she collected in the 30s and 40s while she and my Grandfather Charlie Holsinger were saving to buy a farm.
I assume this is the cover to an issue of Country Gentleman Magazine from the late 30’s or early 40’s. I can’t identify the artist. The painting is really cool, though.

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